Program Manual

The program manual provides a brief overview of the role of the mentor and the mentee, and will guide new participants in their role.

The role of a mentor

Mentors: The volunteers who will be matched with mentees in the program (older girls/women).

Mentees: The youth who will participate in the program and who will be matched with mentors (younger girls).

You will be completing courses online that teach you skills relating to a number of topics, like self-growth, career development, and embracing your uniqueness.

These courses are broken down into modules that take about an hour to complete. As a mentee, you will be connected to an adult mentor that can help support you during transitions, to help support your day-to-day life, and to support your general wellbeing.

Anyone can become a mentor

Be Teachable Have an open mind. Participate in Meetings and Events. Show up and be present. Ask Questions!

Our team writer

100 Shades of Black: Understanding colourism

In this workshop we celebrate the beauty that exists in all shades of brown and highlight the importance of young Black women uniting. This workshop is to educate girls on the impacts of colourism in their daily lives, and spread awareness on the importance of solidarity to appreciate and encompass all shades of brown. 

Colourism is a term that was coined by Alice Walker in 1983, and she defined it as “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color”(Shepherd-Wynn, 2017).

Alice Walker

Colourism dates back to colonial days when slave owners would rape their slaves, creating biracial children who received preferential treatment and privilege, over the darker skinned slaves (Khanna, 2010). Skin tone combined with the intersection of being a woman widely effects women of colour, as beauty standards in the Westerns society idolizes lighter skin tones (Craddock et al, 2018).

Adolescence represents the transitional phase from childhood to adulthood, and is a crucial stage of physiological and socio-emotional development (Craddock et al, 2018). During this stage our self-esteem and how we perceive ourselves is widely impacted by the world around us. Global beauty standards are deeply embedded with colourism, with a lot of the socio-cultural pressures placed on young woman to achieve unrealistic standards of beauty. 

Global beauty standards are deeply embedded in colourism, with socio-cultural pressures places on young women to achieve unrealistic standards of beauty.

Although colourism started centuries ago, the impacts of colourism remain present today, and there is mounting evidence that colourism negatively impact adolescents and adults in a variety of areas which may include: education, dating, and in the criminal justice system.

Workshop Objective:

To empower young Black women by educating them on the past and showcasing that all Black skin is beautiful. As well as redefining beauty standards of the Western world, showing the importance of including all shades of brown with specific inclusive measures for darker shades.

This workshop is appropriate for mentors and mentees to assist them with understanding how colourism can impact girls as young as 3 years old.

Coping with Stigma

Experiences of discrimination are very common amongst Black, Indigenous and Women of colour. Stigma can impede help-seeking and recovery, it can be a threat to social identity. We can cope with stigma by seeking guidance, educating others and challenging others about their stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours.

This workshop will talk about the ways to cope with stigma. The group will be based on facilitating on some of the misunderstandings and media portrayal of Black community that often lead to prejudice attitudes. This behaviour and discrimination can lead to feelings of hopelessness and low self-esteem. The members of the group will learn how stigma profoundly can change how people feel about themselves which result in anxiety and depression. The workshop will offer some of the tips on how to be aware of their attitudes and behaviour. For example, choosing their words carefully, inclusion, and supporting the community.

One of the lessons that I grew up with was to always stay true to yourself and never let what somebody else says distract you from your goals.”

Michelle Obama

Please watch the following video. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you or someone you know. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.

Social Justice

Black women are often overlooked in people’s conversations about racism and sexism even though they face a unique combination of both of these forms of discrimination simultaneously,”

Stewart Coles

This workshop is based on social justice, issues, definition, and mechanisms. The workshop will describe the inclusivity and equal representation of everyone, regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. The facilitator will focus on providing tips and activities for group members to reflect upon social justice issues. In this workshop, facilitator will use the interconnecting lens of social justice. For example, accessing to inclusion and participation, knowing their rights, ability to voice their concerns and to take actions to create change, and working in solidarity to act for the mutual benefits as society.


Please watch the following videos. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.

In a racist society it is not enough to be non-racist, we must be anti-racist.”
— Angela Davis

Join our workshops

Launch Party

On September 16, 2021, Wonderfully Made will host its inaugural launch and information session. This online event features: meeting the founders, information about the program, prizes and more. Why Wonderfully Made? Wonderfully Made is a Black-led grassroots organization, led by youth that aims to cultivate emotional, mental and career wellbeing for Black girls and women.  […]

Program Manual

The program manual provides a brief overview of the role of the mentor and the mentee, and will guide new participants in their role. The role of a mentor Mentors: The volunteers who will be matched with mentees in the program (older girls/women). Mentees: The youth who will participate in the program and who will […]

100 Shades of Black: Understanding colourism

In this workshop we celebrate the beauty that exists in all shades of brown and highlight the importance of young Black women uniting. This workshop is to educate girls on the impacts of colourism in their daily lives, and spread awareness on the importance of solidarity to appreciate and encompass all shades of brown.  Colourism […]

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

Keeping the Pressure on Cannabis Social Justice Reform

According to the 2010-2012 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, nationally, 45% of Black women experienced contact sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. The same survey found that 40% of Black men experienced contact sexual violence, physical violence, and/ or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

Smith et. al, 2017

Please watch the following videos. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you or someone you know. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.


This Workshop

This workshop offers basic understanding on IPV and teaches participants the identify warning signs. Moreover, why it is crucial to learn about those sign, and different stages across the lifespan. The facilitator will encourage group members to participate in the activities where they can explore more about the kinds of IPV. For example, it can be dating violence, dowry abuse, and/or marital rape.

This workshop will also emphasize on why group therapy is likely most practical in order to address IPV. Since IPV is gendered and interconnected with other common issues such as, employment, lack of autonomy/independence, past trauma, and addiction. To promote independence, the facilitator might use an anti-oppression approach in conjunction with a strength-based approach to identified the gender nature of oppression and develop the skills and resiliency required to overcome such barriers.

Coping with Social and Cultural Isolation

According to Terhune, 2008, research findings revealed that women felt socially and culturally isolated and the need for support networks and positive racial socialization messages. Findings also reinforced the effect of class and the danger of homogenizing Black women’s experiences.

This workshop will focus on emotional health as an important domain of our overall well-being. The facilitator will use effective, compassionate and active listening skills to the thought provoking questions such as, what members are thinking, feeling, and the affect it can be on them and on others. Using the mindfulness approaches the facilitator will implement breathing exercises, discussions, and reinforce the positive attitude while having fun with games/quizzes. By practicing compassion for each other, the facilitator and the members of the group will set goals of being flexible and letting go old norms and expectations. They will acknowledge their struggles and appreciating others for showing up, remaining positive, and contributing to the team. The facilitator will encourage the members to share examples of empathy and kindness that they practice recently. 

Consider?

Please watch the following videos. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.

Mindfulness

People of colour experience a disproportionate rate of stress-related health conditions due to various reasons compared to privileged population. Mindfulness meditation has been shown to be effective for managing stress and various stress-related health conditions.

The importance of being still

Loneliness | Mental Health | Healthy News Blog | Lee Health

The workshop will focus on mindfulness which refers to live more consciously and to deal with stressful thoughts, emotions, and it is a form of meditation. This workshop will emphasis on improving concentration and performance, being able to relax, reducing feelings of depression and anxiety. The facilitator will include activities that will connect the participants to familiarizing with the spiritual ideology and cultural practices in order to enhance cultural relevance. Likewise, to demonstrate that mindfulness meditation can be a beneficial therapeutic intervention, the facilitator will employ the benefits of mindfulness. For example, learning how to handle and get rid of stress, become more focused and happier, enjoy more, work more effectively and sleep better.

There will be exercises for the group members to enhance their awareness about physical and mental sensation and being able to present in the moment. For example, the facilitator and group will practice a simple breathing exercise that involves a four-count inhale, hold it for a count of two, and then a four-count exhale. Later, they will discuss how the exercise worked when they were feeling overwhelmed or their mind was racing. Allowing themselves to pause, take deep breaths, and notice their thoughts again and without judgment. Breathing and just noticing their thoughts will not only reduce their feeling of anxiety but it will bring them to the present moment where they will feel more peaceful, clear and energetic for making their future decisions. 

Ready to start? Practice with the Creators for Change: A guided Meditation for Stressed Out Girls

Interested in other workshops?

Self-Development 101

This course is geared to support mentors access tools needed to develop themselves both professionally and interpersonally. The course covers developing achievable goals, healthy communication, managing conflict and emotional regulation. The course consists of short videos, self-reflection and articles. The course should take 1 hour to complete and is a prerequisite course for the mentorship […]

Art Workshop

Explore art expression, creativity and healing in art workshop. Practice using different mediums to express your inner soul. In this workshop, girls use art as a way to express their thoughts, their experiences and creativity. Use mindfulness and meditation to generate your creativity, and to focus on using art to express yourself. Goals: encourage girls […]

Smart Social Media

Overview: This program aims to help young women navigate through our new modern world of social media responsibly; understanding what is acceptable vs unacceptable. We examine different commonly used social media platforms, as well as the content we are exposed to on a daily basis, and how these platforms impact our overall well beings and […]

Black Girls Today

Every organization has a story that explains our reasons for being here, in this place, at this time. Our story began with an idea, generated five years ago, and nurtured by experiences, elders, and key opportunities. To learn more about our story visit: We developed Wonderfully Made and Girls who Lead due to the lack […]

Resilience

“Success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it.”

Maya Angelou

What is Resilience? Resilience is the ability to adapt to life challenges and stressors. We all have resilience. It can emerge at various times in our life. Resiliency occurs when we effectively deal and confront life challenges. As we overcome one challenge, we continue to adapt and grow so we are prepared for the next challenge. Having resilience does not mean that we don’t experience failure and disappointment. Many times, we lose our motivation because our challenges can create barriers and systemic issues that we can’t always fight alone. For example, racism is an example of a systemic issue that can influence our resilience. Many women who are Black, Indigenous and people of colour experience various forms of racism within their lives.

Are the same strategies that help privilege people to overcome on a variety of other life challenges, traumas, and crises also applicable in dealing with racism??

This workshop will focus on the tools on resiliency, as the hardship are inevitable, what counts is the unique ways that people deal with them in terms of moving on or struggling and bouncing back. This workshop will emphasize on understanding the notion of resilience and its importance in life. The facilitator will include the activities and encourage group members to come together and develop a personalized action plan to develop the skills that build resilience. This workshop allows participants to learn by doing and sharing. Therefore, the concept of this workshop is based on active listening and learning, self-assessment activities, demonstrations and individual/group exercises both. 

Our video library

Please watch the following videos. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.

Want to learn more? Register in one of our workshops focusing on building resiliency in areas of the self such as self-esteem, mental health, emotional intelligence, and navigating systems.

What is Mindfulness : definition, benifits and practice | toolshero

Empowerment, racism, race trauma

Black, Indigenous and Women of colour experience racism in many ways. These experiences can lead to an experience of trauma, specifically related to experiences due to race.

As women, we can actively reclaim our identity through engaging in activities that help us feel empowered, that gives us spaces to talk about our experiences, and that can allow us to heal from these experiences.

To help you on your journey, we developed a mentorship program specifically aimed at support women achieve their potential in multiple ways, on a personal, professional, and intersectional level.

Exercise

Watch the following videos. Reflect on key information shared in the video and statements that resonated with you. Did you experience an “aha moment?”, or a moment where you understood where the speaker was coming from because it resembled your own experience? Why? Discuss what you can do to make a difference in how you perceive information and messages from others. Discuss steps you may take to support mentees who may share a similar experience.


Video Library

No you cannot touch my hair

what Beyoncé taught me about race

Confessions of a D girl

Rise king

Your value

Understanding racial trauma

Experiencing racial trauma

Kids speak their minds about race- shows how children’s thoughts on racism develop over time

what systemic racism looks like in Canada- very informative

Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships


Overview

This program focuses on teaching girls to maintain and cultivate healthy
relationships in their lives. As relationships play a key part in a young person’s well being, we
place emphasis on the importance of healthy relationship education to empower young females
to recognize their worth/ value, and promote feelings of support and security, contributing to an
overall healthy well being.


Summary

Young women may experience violence in their relationship. A survey conducted by the United States Department of Justice shows that young women, aged 16-24 years, experience the highest rates of relationship violence, and 1 out of every 3 teenagers has experienced violence in a dating relationship (Bhandari, 2020). A large percentage of teens have reported experiencing some form of abuse, with 60% reporting psychological/ verbal abuse, 18% reporting physical abuse, and 20% reporting sexual abuse (Gordon, 2020). Other types of abuse include digital dating violence, cyberbullying, and financial abuse. As teen years are a transitioning time, young girls are focused on the development of their own identities which includes experimenting with different peer groups, and spending more time focused on friendships and relationships. The absence of self worth, positive support, and overall knowledge of healthy vs unhealthy relationships, as well as other determining factors including experiences of stressful life events, or use of drugs and illegal substances, all contribute to the development of potential unhealthy relationships. Open discussions, and education in a safe space providing positive support, serves as a way to combat the experiences of unhealthy relationships among young girls today.

Objectives

  • Identify the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships
  • Recognize risk factors for dating violence and abuse
  • Explore the importance of self worth/love and value
  • Discuss the importance of creating boundaries.

References: